Humane Society of Midland County offering half-off special for World Spay Day

Just wondering what you guys think of this article…

World Spay Day Tuesday: Humane Society of Midland County offering half-off special on adoptions.

I am happy that they are offering an incentive for people to to bring some of these animals home, although I hope it doesn’t encourage those who are unable to afford continuing care for the animals (food, vet care, etc.) to bite off more than they can chew. So to speak.

Bringing a shelter pet home is a wonderful experience. There is no animal more greatful than one who has lived in less than fortunate circumstances. However, I encourage you to please make sure that you are ready for the commitment that a pet will be for the next 10+ years.

And if you do adopt, CONGRATULATIONS! Bring them in to see us, or send us a picture! We would love to see the new addition to your family!

-Amanda

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Holiday Pet Safety Tips!

It’s that time of year again! Houses are dripping with yards of garland, shiny glass bulbs and strings of twinkling lights. While this is surely a winter wonderland for you, there are a few things to remember to keep the holidays merry for your pet.

Christmas Tree

Anchor your tree. Cats that like to climb an dogs that bound through the house may knock it over. The tree may fall on your pet, or scatter your ornaments that were once out of reach of your pet, providing a range of shiny new toys for them. If you have a live tree, guard the base to discourage pets from drinking the tree water. Stangnant water grows all kinds of bacteria, and your tree may have been coated with fertilizers and pesticides which could end up in the water. It’s safer all around for your pet to stay away. Also, try to refrain from decorating your tree with food, such as stringing popcorn and berries. Pet’s will be more inclined to pull down a tree that smells delicious. Fragile ornaments should be hung high on the tree, far away from swatting paws and wagging tails.

Tinsel and Garland

Cats especially like to play with this stringy, shiny stuff, however, if your cat eats it, it can cause intestinal upset and blockage. It may even result in surgery! The same goes for confetti from your New Year’s celebration. It’s best to keep it out of reach or closely monitor your cats.

Food

There is plenty of rich holiday food to go around, and no doubt your pet will be begging for table scraps, but please refrain from feeding an abundance of rich fatty foods to your furry friend. It could result in GI upset and diarrhea. Do not feed your pet chicken or turkey bones, as they can splinter and cause additional stomach issues. If you are having lots of company in the house, please remind them not to feed your pets from their plates, and no matter how crazy your party gets, never feed your pet any alcohol. Foods to avoid are: chocolate, alcohol, uncooked dough, fruits and nuts, wrappers and aluminum foil, and any medications. Also, keep an eye on your trash can! Even though you may not be offering your pet food, it is still available to them with a little ingenuity.

Plants

Pretty holiday pants can add a beautiful, festive flair to your home, but beware that many holiday plants including; holly, mistletoe and poinsettias are poisonous. Keep them safely out of reach of your pets.

Candles and Lights

Do not leave lighted candles unattended, and use appropriate candle holders on a stable surface so they are less likely to be knocked over. Holiday lights should also be closely monitored, and wires and batteries should be kept out of your pet’s reach.

Gifts

If you are giving your pets toys this holiday season, make sure they are safe and appropriate. Do not allow pets to play with your childrens toys as they may have parts that can break or be swallowed. Also, please DO NOT give a pet as a gift unless you are certain it is part of the family’s plan. Pets are not just a bit of holiday fun, they are a big commitment. Make sure the recipient is able to handle the responsibility that comes with being a pet owner.

Last, but not least, enjoy your pet this holiday season! There is nothing quite as cozy as seeing your dog curled up in front of the fireplace, or your cat batting around the opened wrapping paper. They love the season just as much as we do. Happy Holidays from us here at MAC.

Proud to be AAHA Accredited!

If you are a client here at Midland Animal Clinic, you’ve surely seen, or heard, that we are AAHA Accredited.  We have it proudly posted on our sign out front, in the lobby, on our website and on FaceBook; but what does that mean exactly?

AAHA stands for the American Animal Hospital Association.  They are an association of members who primarily treat companion animals.  AAHA created the Accreditation Program to help set at higher standard of care for companion animals, create a better working realationship between veterinary staff, and provide clinics with a way show their dedication to excellence with their clients and community.

Here at Midland Animal Clinic, we have been Accredited since 1966.  We undergo an intense evaluation process every three years in which we are evaluated on over 900 standards.  Some of the areas on which we are graded include: patient care, surgery, pharmacy, laboratory, exam facilities, pet health records, cleanliness, emergency services, dental and nursing care, diagnostic imaging, anesthesiology, and continuing education.

Of all of the small animal practices in the United States, only 15% are Accredited through AAHA.  We are very proud to be the only clinic in Midland County with this achievement!

Cold Weather Pet Tips

It’s that time of year again here in Midland.  There’s frost on the car windows in the morning, your breath looks like little puffs of smoke, and there’s even been some snow on the ground already.  I’m sure you’re bundled up and as ready as you can be for a few months spent in a frozen tundra, but is your pet?  Here are a couple of things to remember this winter to keep your pet cozy and warm.

Keep your cat inside.  Cats aren’t always able to find adequate shelter, food, or water while outside in the winter months.  If your cat is typically indoor/outdoor, it’s best to keep them inside until the thaw in the spring.  Cat’s looking for warmth outdoors have a habit of finding it in car engines, so be sure to knock on the hood of your car while you’re scraping the ice off of your windows to ensure you don’t seriously injure or kill a cat when you start your car.

While walking your dog, please keep it on a leash.  Dogs can much more easily lose their scent in snow, and may be unable to find their way home if they take off (which they are apt to do if snow is falling heavily).  This is especially important if there are ponds, lakes or rivers nearby where your pet could fall through the ice.  More pets are lost in the winter months than any other season, so please make sure your dog has the proper identification tags.  You can also give us a call, or set up an appointment to get your pet microchipped so it is more likely that they make it home to you should they come up missing.

After your pet has been outside, it is important that you wipe down their feet, legs and stomach to get rid of anything they may have picked up.  Ice chunks left between toes can cause pads to become irritated and bleed.  Pets are also apt to pick up salt, antifreeze, and other potentially dangerous chemicals while on walks which can cause serious issues when they lick their paws later.  It is also important that you are not contributing to the problem of your pet picking up harmful substances.  Please make sure you clean up any antifreeze that may have spilled (if it is possible, use propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol) , and try to use pet friendly deicing products on walkways. You can visit ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for more information.

Leave your pet’s coat longer this winter.  A longer coat helps protect against the colder weather.  Brushing your pet’s coat often and vigorously is also recommended.  The dry, winter climate depletes moisture from your dog’s skin and coat; brushing improves skin, coat, and circulation.  Also, matted fur does not protect against the cold as well as fur that is regularly brushed.  When a coat is ‘fluffy’ the air pockets created help conserve heat, much like layering clothing.  If your dog has a short coat, a sweater or jacket is recommended outerwear.  Also, make sure that if you bathe your pet, they are completely dry before venturing outside.  For pets with dry and sensitive paws, try spraying their pads with cooking spray before taking them out for long periods for a little added protection.

Puppies and elderly pets are more susceptible to cold weather problems.  Puppies are more difficult to housebreak in the winter because they do not tolerate cold weather well.  Elderly and arthritic pets have more stiffness and joint pain due to the cold.  Shoveling out a “potty spot” for puppies, elderly pets, and small breeds can help make doing their business a little easier for them.

Frostbite and hypothermia are major concerns in the winter.  Ears, feet and noses are most apt to become frostbitten.  Skin may appear red, gray or whiteish and may peel off if frostbite is occurring.  To treat, move pet to warm area and apply warm, moist towels to the area, and change them frequently.  DO NOT RUB AFFECTED AREA!! Rubbing the skin is likely to cause more damage.  Take your pet to a veterinarian for further treatment.  Frostbite and hypothermia are more likely if a pet is left outside for an extended period, or if the pet is left unattended in a car.  A car acts like a refrigerator in the winter, and pets can easily freeze if left inside.

Ensure that your pet has plenty of food and fresh water.  Pets that are outside for long periods of time should have food increased to ensure that their coat is healthy and thick.  Making sure that fresh water is available to your pet is very important.  Water bowls can freeze over and cause a pet to search for water in other areas, such as puddles, which can contain antifreeze and other harmful chemicals.

Inside the home make sure that your pet has a warm place to sleep.  A cozy blanket, bed or pillow placed away from drafty areas is ideal.  Tile floors and basements can become very chilly.  Pets should also be kept from getting too close to fire places and space heaters.  Animals can easily knock over a space heater causing a fire hazard, or get tails too close to hot coils and flames.  Another good thing to check inside the home is the furnace for carbon monoxide leaks.  Pets spend more time in the home than their owners and are more susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning.

We enjoy caring for your pets and want to see them continue to be happy and healthy.  Schedule your pet for a winter check up and discuss any questions or concerns you may have for your furry family members this winter.